Cover of: A cursing brain? | Howard I. Kushner

A cursing brain?

the histories of Tourette syndrome
  • 303 Pages
  • 4.59 MB
  • 4347 Downloads
  • English
by
Harvard University Press , Cambridge, Mass
Tourette syndrome -- His
StatementHoward I. Kushner.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC375 .K87 1999
The Physical Object
Paginationxii, 303 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL376784M
ISBN 100674180224
LC Control Number98038733

This book charts the course of the disagreements over what exactly constitutes the syndrome.”―Steven Poole, The Guardian “[A Cursing Brain?] explores the cultural and medical assumptions that have changed the classification of Tourette syndrome since the condition was first identified in the early 19th century.”Cited by: 2.

A Cursing Brain. traces the problematic classification of Tourette syndrome through three distinct but overlapping stories: that of the claims of medical knowledge, that of patients' experiences, and that of cultural expectations and assumptions. Earlier researchers asserted that the bizarre ticcing and impromptu vocalizations were Pages: A Cursing Brain.

traces the problematic classification of Tourette syndrome through three distinct but overlapping stories: that of the claims of medical knowledge, that of patients’ experiences, and that of cultural expectations and assumptions. Earlier researchers asserted that the bizarre ticcing and impromptu vocalizations were.

A Cursing Brain. is a thought-provoking and balanced historical synthesis of the biological and psychoanalytic ideologies surrounding Tourette syndrome., I highly recommend A Cursing Brain.

as a brilliant and readable A cursing brain? book of how, over time, we change our minds when faced with a puzzling and hard-to-treat constellation of socially.

A well-documented, scholarly analysis of the changing ways in which practitioners have tried to explain the baffling phenomenon of motor tics and involuntary shouts, barks, and curses exhibited by those with Tourette syndrome.

Kushner, a medical historian (San Diego State Univ.) grounded in neurobiology and neurochemistry, opens with the "case of the cursing marquise," a French noblewoman whom. Get this from a library. A cursing brain?: the histories of Tourette syndrome. [Howard I Kushner] -- A study of Tourette syndrome, "a set of behaviors, involuntary shouting (sometimes cursing) as well as obsessive-compulsive actions.

Reveals how cultural and medical assumptions have determined. A Cursing Brain. A cursing brain? book Book Description: Over a century and a half ago, a French physician reported the bizarre behavior of a young aristocratic woman who would suddenly, without warning, erupt in a startling fit of obscene shouts and curses.

In short, A Cursing Brain. is a very interesting history-of-medicine book that considers how Tourette’s syndrome has been understood and viewed over the past 2 centuries. ” —Robert L. Findling, M.D., Journal of Clinical Psychology.

It is a bit odd to read a book about a topic that I have studied for the better part of 20 years. A Cursing Brain. is well written and meticulously documented.

It wonderfully illustrates how the historical succession of causal explanations from early in the 19th century to the mids has transformed the categorization and treatment of motor. Often cited is a 19th century stroke case, in which a patient with brain damage lost the ability to form and understand speech, a condition known as aphasia, But he was able to swear, saying "I f.

A Cursing Brain: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome By Howard Kushner His book is as crucial a contribution to the small shelf of serious scholarship on.

Book InformationA Cursing Brain. The Histories of Tourette Syndrome. By Howard Kushner. Harvard University Press. Cambridge, MA and London. xiii + Hardback, £,   A Cursing Brain. The Histories of Tourette Syndrome. By Howard I. Kushner (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press, xii plus 3O3pp.

How are diseases identified and defined. Although seemingly simple and straightforward, this. A study of Tourette syndrome, "a set of behaviors, involuntary shouting (sometimes cursing) as well as obsessive-compulsive actions. Reveals how cultural and medical assumptions have determined and radically altered its characterization and treatment from the early nineteenth century to the present.".

As it turns out, there is a body of research on the neurobiology of swearing, and it largely supports the idea that the brain treats curse words as special.

One source of evidence comes from Tourette’s syndrome (TS), a neurological condition characterized by involuntary behavioral tics.

In some TS cases, these tics are manifested as.

Download A cursing brain? FB2

This is the newest book on the list. It’s a really good general summary about how swearing works. It’s not so much interested in the history, although it does cover it a bit, but it’s got a big discussion of swearing and the brain. It talks about how swearing is this funny combination of left-brain and right-brain.

Bulletin of the History of Medicine () Howard I. Kushner. A Cursing Brain. The Histories of Tourette Syndrome. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, xiii + pp. $   The key message of the book was that the utterances of curse words do not simply break the rules of polite society; they break the rules of typical brain beha I thought he was going to try joking his way through a book about cursing, which didn't seem particularly interesting to me/5().

The Science of Swearing A new book explains the neuroscience of why we swear—and how it can sway our listeners. Image from the cover of Emma Byrne's new book, Swearing. The emotional potency of the curse is diluted as it's used more and more.

So save your s for when you really need it. The amygdala is part of the limbic system, which is emphatically involved in interpreting and expressing emotions — intrinsic to cursing.

Swear words are an important component of human beings’ emotional language. Believe it or not, the third of these options is the one with the most brain benefits. In her new book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of. According to Richard Stephens, a psychologist and author of Black Sheep: The Hidden Benefits of Being Bad, “Swearing is handled by the brain differently than regular language.

While most language is located in the cortex and specific language areas in the left hemisphere of the brain, swearing might be associated with a more rudimentary. Benjamin Bergen In What the F, cognitive scientist Benjamin K. Bergen delves into the history, cultural roles, and neuroscience of cursing.

While not for everyone, this engaging (and sometimes funny) book reveals profanity to be more than just crude language; it is a. Swearing is usually regarded as simply lazy language or an abusive lapse in civility.

But as Emma Byrne shows in her book, Swearing Is Good for You: The Amazing Science of. Unlimited ebook acces A Cursing Brain?: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome full ebook A Cursing Brain?: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome|acces here A Cursing Brain?: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome|A Cursing Brain?: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome (any file),A Cursing Brain?: The Histories of Tourette Syndrome view for Full,A Cursing.

One early hypothesis suggested that the brain might be retrieving simple sounds at random, but through a laborious letter writing campaign soliciting examples from researchers worldwide, Sidtis showed in that the process couldn’t be arbitrary: From Spain to Sri Lanka, people with TS that have cursing episodes spout only offensive terms.

In an age of keyboards and touch-screens, some might argue that teaching cursive is a vestigial nicety in today’s classrooms. Even handwriting, much less cursive writing, is neglected in the national curriculum guidelines supported by 45 states at the end of Many educators and scientists, however, are railing against the trend.

Description A cursing brain? FB2

This book charts the course of the disagreements over what exactly constitutes the syndrome.”―Steven Poole, The Guardian “[A Cursing Brain?] explores the cultural and medical assumptions that have changed the classification of Tourette syndrome since the condition was first identified in the early 19th century.”Reviews: 4.

Books shelved as curses: Impossible by Nancy Werlin, Holes by Louis Sachar, The Book of Speculation by Erika Swyler, Howl's Moving Castle by Diana Wynne. 1. Introduction. Cursing represents a powerful and ubiquitous component of natural language.

In American English, cursing serves beneficial functions such as pain alleviation, increased grip strength, and social bonding among peers (Bergen,Stephens et al.,Stephens et al., ).These benefits are counterbalanced by a variety of negative social and/or legal consequences.

Cursing can cause others to think negatively of you. The book Cuss Control says: “The way we speak can determine who our friends will be, the amount of respect we will get from our families and coworkers, the quality of our relationships, how influential we will be, whether we get the job or the promotion, and how strangers respond to us.”It also says: “Ask yourself if your relationships.

In extreme cases, the hotline to the brain's emotional system can make swearing harmful, as when road rage escalates into physical violence. But.

Details A cursing brain? PDF

Many studies suggest that the brain processes swearing in the lower regions, along with emotion and instinct. Scientists theorize that instead of processing a swearword as a series of phonemes, or units of sound that must be combined to form a word, the brain Author: Tracy V.

Wilson.